Reduce Consumption of Seal Water

Author:

Fluid Sealing Association

Publisher:

Pumps & Systems

Date Published:

October, 2007

 

Two imperatives for many of today’s industrial plants are to reduce the cost of operations through the enhancement of rotating equipment reliability and enhanced energy efficiency of pumping systems.

One place to look for a significant, yet relatively easy “quick win,” is the seal flush water going to packing, single, and double seals. In many industrial plants water is being used to provide lubrication, cooling and/or as a means to exclude a harmful process fluid from the stuffing box or seal chamber.

The means for providing an external water flush or quench are generally described as API/ISO piping plans 32 (ANSI 7332), 54 (ANSI 7354) or 62 (ANSI 7362).

 

 

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Non-OEM Pump Rebuild Shops Part II: Guideline Details

Author:

Heinz P. Bloch, P.E., Jim Steiger, Robert Bluse

Publisher:

Maintenance Technology

Date Published:

September, 2007

 

The first installment of this series highlighted general guidelines regarding the selection of competent non-OEM pump repair facilities. This month, these guidelines are discussed in more detail.

 

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You get what you inspect. That said, a pump user must have a repair specification. It may or may not be identical to the specification used by the non-OEM competent pump repair shop (CPRS). Where the specification or checklist of the CPRS differs from the one of the user/purchaser, the issues need to be explored and the ramifications of any deviations understood. At that time, waivers are issued and details of the understanding are documented.

In any event, unless a process pump manufacturer gives specific and different values or measurements for a particular make, size or model, experience shows the guidelines in this article to be useful”and valid. Even an in-house pump shop would benefit from making it a habit to use and apply the following assembly dimension checklist. Some of the listed diametral clearance and/or interference tolerances will be stricter than what certain pump manufacturers allow (for reasons of internal cost savings, perhaps). But, then again, this simply illustrates the opportunities to improve on some OEM products.

Best-of-Class user shops often make copies, laminate them and either hand them to each of their shop technicians or post them near mechanic/technician workstations. CPRS facilities use similar approaches to disseminate the information in Sidebar 1, Best-of-Class Pump Specifications, to their staffs.

Beyond the actual specifications listed in Sidebar 1, there are other Best-of- Class type guidelines to consider when rebuilding a pump. A CPRS certainly considers them.

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Non-OEM Pump Rebuild Shops Part I: Facts And Considerations

Author:

Heinz P. Bloch, P.E. Process Machinery Consulting, Jim Steiger, HydroAire Inc., Robert Bluse, Pump Services Consulting

Publisher:

Maintenance Technology

Date Published:

July, 2007

 

In light of so many consolidations across the pump industry, is it any wonder that legacy brand experience often is lost? These days, some OEMs may not be able to offer the same engineering competence they once had in the area of pump rebuilding.

Trying to rebuild a vintage process pump to original OEM specifications makes no sense, given current pump rebuilding capabilities and changes to system performance that occur over time. Thus, a qualified independent rebuild shop deploying highly experienced personnel and a full range of state-of-the-art technologies (including balancing and alignment, vibration analysis, ultrasonics, infrared thermography, oil analysis and non-destructive testing techniques, among others) can verifiably offer high-quality upgrades that improve both uptime and efficiency consistent with current system performance requirements.

 

 

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State of the Aftermarket

Author:

George Harris, Hydro Inc.

Publisher:

Pumps & Systems

Date Published:

April, 2007

 

Observations on the changes, trends and challenges that both suppliers and pump users may face in the coming years.

 

Changes

Perhaps the most pronounced change we have experienced is that the customer we serve is no longer a “local” customer, but is increasingly a large national or global organization with locations throughout the world.

These global customers are interested in working with suppliers that can provide a comprehensive range of specialized services with a high degree of professionalism. Because they are interested in reducing the number of suppliers with which they work, they often prefer to deal with suppliers that can effectively service multiple locations.

Over time, this will change the landscape of aftermarket suppliers, with smaller, local organizations being reduced. The aftermarket providers that emerge from this period of change will be larger companies with broader capabilities and services, particularly those that are strong in engineering and technical services and in employing new technologies.

When industrial capital projects in the U.S. were in a slump during the 1980s and 1990s, a dramatic consolidation of pump companies resulted in only a few major broadbased OEMs dominating the industry. Today, the pump industry enjoys resurging demand – new power plants, major refinery expansions, oil sands projects in Canada and so on – that is straining productive capacity, with deliveries for both pumps and replacement parts often exceeding acceptable parameters.

This strain, in turn, creates opportunities for qualified aftermarket parts suppliers.

 

Trends

The focus of our business is no longer the “machine shop,” but rather technological improvements that continue to change and advance the way we operate.

 

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OEM vs. Third Party Debate

Author:

Bob Bluse, president of Pump Service Consulting, Inc. and George Harris, president of Hydro Inc.

Publisher:

Pumps & Systems

Date Published:

May, 2006

 

In the March issue of Pumps & Systems, contributing editor Ross McKay offered his opinion on “The Impeller – Casing Partnership.” Bob Bluse, president of Pump Service Consulting, Inc. and George Harris, president of Hydro, Inc., contributed opposing opinions which were published in the May issue of Pumps & Systems.

After reading “The Impeller – Casing Partnership” column by Ross Mackay (Let’s Get Practical, March 2006), I took away a sense that if you do not buy your pump parts – especially impellers and casings – from the OEM, pump owners are headed for trouble. This opinion / perception would have been universally accepted 20 or more years ago. However, it is far from the reality that exists in the pump parts business today.

Let’s consider the more current situation. Ross mentions that “the success of this practice will depend to a great extend on the expertise and capability of the supplier in question.” This is a true statement, but it should also apply to OEMs and not just third-party parts suppliers (replicators). Current trends in the OEM business model indicate they no longer make their own parts: they just provide the administrative processing dynamics of supplying parts. They have sold or shutdown their foundries, manufacture offshore, source to the lowest price provider, and sparingly participate in the QA/QC component of manufactured parts.

Some third-party parts suppliers (replicators) have improved their capability by investing in current technology such as CMM, CFD, Faro-Arms, materials analyzers, rapid prototyping, test capability, etc. They have added resources (engineers, technicians, craftspeople) to their organizations to use this technology and increase their capabilities in hydraulic design, metallurgy, and quality, while still providing a competitive price and delivery. This resource has come from the OEMs due to the large scale consolidations in the pump industry and closure of foundries in North America, bringing with them years of experience and knowledge.

Some third-party parts suppliers have their own foundry and pattern shop onsite, enabling more consistent process execution (quality/deliver) through the entire process of manufacturing cast pump parts. Isn’t it ironic that a few of the major pump OEMs have purchased third-party parts suppliers (replicators) in the past years? That’s something to think about!

Ross also mentions that “when they (impellers/casings) need to be replaced, make sure you get full value from the original hydraulic design – that is only available from the pump OEM.” How likely is that, by the time you have to replace the impeller or casing, the original hydraulic design is consistent with current system performance and requirements?

Cast components are usually the last parts of a pump to wear out, taking years of operation for them to warrant replacement. During this time, the system degrades, process conditions change, and changing demands in process system performance require consideration of doing something different, rather than going back to the original hydraulic design.

Additionally, repairs, upgrades, and retrofits made to the pump by owners and pump service companies result in changes which seldom find their way back to the OEM original pump Bill of Material, resulting in a record that is not accurate and likely not to provide the best hydraulic solution. The result of this collective activity makes a “moving target” of the value of the original hydraulic design and who really is the OEM.

Suffice it to say that achieving optimal pump hydraulic performance is more challenging today than in the past. However, the resources to do so are also more plentiful and more available than they have been in the past.

The OEM/third-party parts supplier (replicator) debate will continue, but the changes in the pumps parts business landscape have reduced the capability and performance gap between OEMs and third-party parts suppliers. This competitive environment presents great opportunities for pump owners and users that did not exist previously and offers them a choice in terms of “getting practical” when selecting their pump parts supplier to optimize pump performance. Continue reading