HydroTex Deer Park Service Center Relocating to La Porte, TX

The new 33,000 square building in La Porte, Texas.

HydroTex, a subsidiary of Hydro, Inc., announces the move of its Deer Park operation to a new 33,000 square foot building in La Porte, TX.

The new service center will offer expanded capacity for analysis, engineering, rebuilding and repair services for pump systems and rotating equipment as well as climate controlled storage of pumps and parts.

Located near the busy Houston Ship Channel, the new facility is ideally situated to serve the needs of surrounding industries using pumping equipment of any capacity. To learn more about the new facility or to schedule a shop visit, please contact HydroTex.

 

Source: pumpsandsystems.com

Pipeline Receives Pump & Seal Improvements

Seal upgrade and pump repair in the U.S. midwest boost efficiency and reliability with minimal downtime.

Written by: Ken Babusiak, John Ciffone
Publisher: Pumps & Systems / November 2016

 

Mechanical seals on pumps in the oil and gas industry often need to be upgraded to meet more stringent standards, such as tighter emissions regulations. More advanced seals also offer companies increased efficiency and reliability.

Older pumps, however, sometimes need to be modified to accommodate these enhancements because the newer parts may not be the same size and shape as the ones they are replacing. In these cases, a parts supplier can partner with an aftermarket engineering firm to come up with a long-term plan for revitalizing older pumps. The refurbished pumps can offer benefits including direct cost savings and a reduction in repair and maintenance.

An Upgrade Plan Emerges

In 2011, a field service engineer was at a pipeline station for service when a technician informed him that the company was considering overhauling all of its pumps as preventive maintenance. The company planned to investigate the possibility of upgrading mechanical seals.

The field service engineer and his team decided to analyze all of the user’s pumping stations from Illinois to Iowa—about 500 miles of pipeline. Every field service engineer who worked on the pipeline met in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where a regional engineer led a meeting about what would be the best technology solution for this user.

The team decided to replace the existing single mechanical seals with a mechanical seal developed specifically for single-seal installations and designed to attain maximum achievable controllable technology (MACT) compliance in light hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Image 1. The bottom half of the coupling end bearing housing installed on the pump with the bottom half of the journal bearing, oil rings and seals installed (Images courtesy of Hydro Inc.)

Image 1. The bottom half of the coupling end bearing housing installed on the pump with the bottom half of the journal bearing, oil rings and seals installed (Images courtesy of Hydro Inc.)

The field service engineers provided information on the pumps in their area, the seal data and the coupling information. All of the pumps would require minor modifications to accommodate these new seals. The team collated information about the pumps and wrote the necessary engineering projects for the preliminary drawings. Once the drawings were approved and finalized, the pumps were sent to a pump repair and service provider to be upgraded to accept the higher-technology seal.

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How Root-Cause Analysis Solved a Vertical Turbine Pump Failure

A comprehensive approach to reverse engineering helped to establish the differences between the stainless steel and original bronze impellers.

Written by:  Hydro, Inc.
Publisher: Pumps & Systems / March 2016

 

When a severe pump failure involving one of three installed circulating water makeup pumps happened, facility personnel grew concerned about the root cause. The subject pump failed just 40 days after its commissioning.
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Image 1. A crack in the discharge head flange that involved fatigue failure of the weld of a pump.

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Image 2 (right). The pump’s impeller wear ring landing shows heavy scoring.

The equipment in question consisted of three-stage vertical turbine pumps running either in standalone or in parallel operation as required. The failure manifested itself through high vibration and caused severe scoring of the pump shaft and wear ring landings, leading to fatigue failure of the weld on the discharge head flange (see Images 1 and 2). The commissioned pump was refurbished and rebuilt by another company’s service center with spare impellers supplied by an original equipment manufacturer. No changes to the geometry had reportedly been made, although the impeller material had been upgraded from bronze to stainless steel.

The plant initiated its internal root-cause analysis process, and the failed pump required emergency repair. The station sought a company to conduct the repair, and the firm reviewed the customer-supplied documents and background providing the possible causes of the failure. Continue reading